Are Narcotics Anonymous Meetings Really Right for Me?

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the Take-Away

Narcotics Anonymous, though effective, is not right for everyone. The following questions can help you decide if it’s the best program for your recovery.

You have a lot of options to choose from when recovery from a substance abuse addiction. You can enter a treatment program, go to an inpatient facility, or even try an outpatient clinic.

Narcotics Anonymous is also an option, but is it right for you?

Many people are afraid to go to these meetings because they seem intimidating and too in-depth. However, Narcotics Anonymous has helped millions of people over the years, meaning there’s a good chance it’s the perfect program for you.

Can You Commit to a 12-Step Program?

One of the most notable features of Narcotics Anonymous are the 12 steps. These are a set of principles that are used to guide you on your recovery.

Addicts who go to Narcotics Anonymous meetings are expected to adhere to and follow the 12 steps in order. They begin by having you admit you were powerless over your drug use, and end by having you commit to bringing your message of recovery to other addicts.

While these steps might seem cumbersome, they are extremely effective in helping addicts overcome their issues. However, if a 12 step program isn’t for you, then it might be time to look into different treatment options.

Give us a call at (800) 407-7195 to learn more about what recovery programs are available to you.

Can You Accept Help From a Higher Power?

Narcotics Anonymous Meetings

You may have a difficult time with NA if you can’t accept help from a higher power.

Another aspect of Narcotics Anonymous is the focus on a higher power. However, this higher power does not have to be from any particular religion. The whole organization is completely unbiased and not sponsored or influenced by any religious sect or denomination.

Instead, addicts are asked to use their own personal understanding of a higher power to guide them through the process. The suggested guidelines note that this power should be “loving, caring, and greater than one’s self.”

Therefore, while you might not believe in God, you can still to Narcotics Anonymous without fear.

Do You Want Support From Fellow Addicts?

Some drug addicts feel like they can make it through their recovery all alone. These people might not be interested in Narcotics Anonymous because it is so group-based.

However, studies show that group recovery systems are much better at helping addicts than simply going it alone.

At Narcotics Anonymous, you’ll definitely be in a group setting. Each meeting is based around sharing and listening to personal stories of addicts. It is through this sharing that members can bond and help each other.

List of NA Meeting Topics by Step

Do You Want to Help Others in Their Recovery?

When undergoing recovery, you might only be able to focus on your own problems, which is ok. Taking care of your life should always come first.

However, many people find a huge benefit in helping others overcome their drug addictions. Narcotics Anonymous is especially set up this way, as former members usually become sponsors to help newcomers or encourage attendance.

Research shows that 68 percent of Americans feel better after they volunteer, while 77 percent said it improved their emotional health.

Therefore, helping out others while helping out yourself could actually benefit everyone in the long run. If you’d like to receive this benefit, then Narcotics Anonymous is a good choice.

As you can see, Narcotics Anonymous might not be right for everyone. However, it is definitely a viable option for most recovering drug addicts.

If you’d like help finding a group that meets near you, just give us a call at (800) 407-7195 to talk with one of our helpful representatives.

References:

https://medschool.vanderbilt.edu/psychiatry/files/psychiatry/public_files/9D%20-%2012%20Step%20Program%20Information%20-%20An%20AA%20primer%20for%20visitors.pdf

http://www.cityvision.edu/wiki/narcotics-anonymous

https://addiction.surgeongeneral.gov/chapter-5-recovery.pdf

http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/staying_sober_through_service